The brains of children with ADHD do not recognize angry expressions

Posted By on September 29, 2014

Inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior in children with ADHD can result in social problems and they tend to be excluded from peer activities. [READ MORE HERE]

Source: ADHD News Today

ADHD: Brains not recognizing angry expressions

Posted By on September 25, 2014

The characteristics of facial expression recognition of children with ADHD has been initially identified by researchers by measuring hemodynamic response in the brain. They showed that children with ADHD showed significant hemodynamic response to the happy expression but not to the angry expression. This difference in the neural basis for the recognition of facial expression might be responsible for impairment in social recognition and the establishment of peer-relationships. [READ MORE HERE]

Source: Science Daily

Few kids receive psychotherapy along with medication for ADHD, study finds

Posted By on September 24, 2014

For many children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, medication alone can manage symptoms. But evidence shows that some affected children do better and can take lower doses of stimulant medications when they receive behavioral therapy along with ADHD drugs. A new study finds that about one quarter of commercially-insured children who are treated with medication for ADHD also receive psychotherapy, and the percentage is far lower in many parts of the country. [READ MORE HERE]

Source: Science Daily

Brain networks to handle internal & external tasks mature more slowly in ADHD

Posted By on September 17, 2014

A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without. [READ MORE HERE]

Source: ADHD News Today

Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD brain study finds slower development of key connections

Posted By on September 16, 2014

A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without. Kids and teens with ADHD, a new study finds, lag behind others of the same age in how quickly their brains form connections within, and between, key brain networks. [READ MORE HERE]

Source: Science Daily